Buddhist Boer

If mindfulness doesn’t actually resolve conditions like depression, how does it help?" I did a qualitative study of participants in an MBSR course and I found that they appear follow a trajectory. People show up and they really want relief. They have a lot of different conditions. They are seeking help. They think that maybe this course is going to take away their problems. And the teacher on the first day says that’s not what this class is about. This class is about learning how to be present to your own inner life, including distress and suffering that you may have been avoiding. By weeks four and five, people really get it. They’ve been sitting and their suffering has not gone away, and there’s this profound experience people have in which they realize that maybe just wiping away the suffering is not what this is about. Then people have a lot of generalized distress, and they go through it and end up on the other side. They realize, “I can face that!
Ken is often quick to mention that there is a vast difference between Secular Mindfulness and Buddhist Practise. Rob Nairn, my primary meditation teacher, is quick to say that the bum-on-cushion time is the same, even though the context between Secular Mindfulness and Buddhism is different. So this evening with Ken promises to be an interesting discussion - just what is this thing that I do for 40 minutes a day? Maybe I’ve not even been meditating at all.
I’m also in need of the “inner strength” thing. Sounds useful to not just crumble into a heap at the slightest hint of an obstacle.

Ken is often quick to mention that there is a vast difference between Secular Mindfulness and Buddhist Practise. Rob Nairn, my primary meditation teacher, is quick to say that the bum-on-cushion time is the same, even though the context between Secular Mindfulness and Buddhism is different. So this evening with Ken promises to be an interesting discussion - just what is this thing that I do for 40 minutes a day? Maybe I’ve not even been meditating at all.

I’m also in need of the “inner strength” thing. Sounds useful to not just crumble into a heap at the slightest hint of an obstacle.

(Source: kagyupretoria)

You can’t save the world when you’re running on empty.
Aside from the toll it takes on your own body, mind and spirit, ignoring your need for self-care steals your capacity to be strongly, creatively, and lovingly present in the world.

This benefits no one.

[Body of Wisdom ~ Sacred Self Care description]
You can start by thinking kind thoughts about everyone you have contact with every day. If you have mindfulness, you can do this every waking minute with everyone you deal with. Whenever you see someone, consider that, like yourself, that person wants happiness and wants to avoid suffering. We are all the same. We all feel that way. All beings feel that way. Even the tiniest insect recoils from harm.
Bhante Henepola Gunaratana. Beyond Mindfulness in Plain English (Page 42). (via abiding-in-peace)

(via nathanialroyale)

Confession of not Changing my Mind

The Four Thoughts that Change the Mind are meant to be just that: a specific study that really sinks into the deeper recesses of the mind why Dharma practise is the most important thing we can do with our lives. We are fortunate enough to be in the position to practise, and yet we don’t know how long this opportunity will last. Everything we do will have repercussions, and some of those repercussions are truly horrific.

I’m in the process of contemplating these things, and although I’ve spent many hours wrestling with this I am no expert. I recommend this excellent series on YouTube: Ken Holmes on the Four Thoughts

I’m holding back on a fundamental level. I don’t want to admit that my life will end. I don’t want to admit that I’ll probably end up in hell next time round. I don’t want to admit that there will be a next time round.

In one of the earlier videos, Ken mentions that really embodying these Four Thoughts is what differentiates a foolish person from a mature person. Therefore it is safe to say that I’m not maturing, that my deluded mind is insisting on staying deluded and not willing to take the plunge towards wisdom and maturity.

I guess the only thing to do is to accept that my mind is not ready. There’s a reason there are different levels of Buddhism for the different types of Buddhists. And if I’m only a Type 1, maybe I must focus rather on the advice given for Type 1: encouraging good ethics in my daily life. It’s so tempting to pretend to be a Type 3, especially since I’ve taken the Aspirant Bodhisattva vows, but the mind is where it is and there’s no sense in lying to myself about where I am.

I just want to be happy. Meditation helps me know where my mind is, and has helped me to let go of unpleasant events as they occur. But to ensure that I will have a happy life next time round, I need to create the conditions for that.

And maybe one day I will be able to turn away from Samsara fully and plunge into the Dharma wholeheartedly.

Type 1: Buddhism for people who just want to enjoy the world’s pleasures. These teachings focus on Ethics and Generosity.

Type 2: Buddhism for people who are tired of the world. This path leads towards long retreats and monasticism

Type 3: The Bodhisattva path of working tirelessly for the benefit of each and every sentient being.

How we treat our fellow human beings is not a peripheral issue, sidelined by supposedly “good theology.” It’s central. It’s everything.
At some point, we need to stop identifying with our weaknesses and shift our allegiance to our basic goodness. It’s highly beneficial to understand that our limitations are not absolute and monolithic, but relative and removable.
Pema Chödrön,
No Time to Lose: A Timely Guide to the Way of the Bodhisattva (via yoga9vipassana)

(via inhabitude)

Whatever we do, he advised, should be natural and spontaneous, uninhibited like a young child. This is especially true when we want to help others; our compassion and loving kindness should arise naturally and spontaneously, even though this might mean that sometimes we will face rejection when we were only trying to help. On the other hand, too much thinking and conceptualisation can interfere when we try to help people; natural spontaneity is very important in expressing our innate love and compassion.

HEAVEN AND HELL

There’s another story that you may have read that has to do with what we call heaven and hell, life and death, good and bad. It’s a story about how those things don’t really exist except as a creation of our own minds. It goes like this: A big burly samurai comes to the wise man and says, “Tell me the nature of heaven and hell.” And the roshi looks him in the face and says: “Why should I tell a scruffy, disgusting, miserable slob like you?” The samurai starts to get purple in the face, his hair starts to stand up, but the roshi won’t stop, he keeps saying, “A miserable worm like you, do you think I should tell you anything?” Consumed by rage, the samurai draws his sword, and he’s just about to cut off the head of the roshi. Then the roshi says, “That’s hell.” The samurai, who is in fact a sensitive person, instantly gets it, that he just created his own hell; he was deep in hell. It was black and hot, filled with hatred, self-protection, anger, and resentment, so much so that he was going to kill this man. Tears fill his eyes and he starts to cry and he puts his palms together and the roshi says, “That’s heaven.”

byron130:

18.05.2014I learned yesterday that when you see a bee on the ground that isn’t moving, it’s not necessarily dead, it’s probably just dead tired from carrying lots of pollen and needs re-energising. So if you mix a tiny bit of water with some sugar and let it drink it will give it the boost it needs to continue on its way. Bizarrely, this exact thing happened today! I found a knackered bee, mixed up some sugar water, gave it a drink and watched it guzzle and guzzle then suddenly come back to life. It was amazing! Thank you patrick, it was an excellent tip that i’ll never forget and will continue to pass on to others!

There were about twenty bees that had gotten into the house and exhausted themselves against the window trying to get out again.  Most of them died, but I saw one or two moving.  I picked them up (carefully!  Don’t want to get stung!) to take them outside but they were struggling.  Then, lucky for them, I remembered this post, and dropped some sugar water next to them.  They revived after drinking, and three of them made it.

So thanks for sharing this, it helped!

What didn’t help was to make a saucer full of sugar water and just dropping the bees in there.  They almost drowned.  (Idiot compassion much?)  I should have remembered the spoon like in this picture.  I ended up just creating little drops of water on the ground and kind of pushing each bee’s face into it.  She inevitably started drinking.

byron130:

18.05.2014
I learned yesterday that when you see a bee on the ground that isn’t moving, it’s not necessarily dead, it’s probably just dead tired from carrying lots of pollen and needs re-energising. So if you mix a tiny bit of water with some sugar and let it drink it will give it the boost it needs to continue on its way. Bizarrely, this exact thing happened today! I found a knackered bee, mixed up some sugar water, gave it a drink and watched it guzzle and guzzle then suddenly come back to life. It was amazing! Thank you patrick, it was an excellent tip that i’ll never forget and will continue to pass on to others!

There were about twenty bees that had gotten into the house and exhausted themselves against the window trying to get out again.  Most of them died, but I saw one or two moving.  I picked them up (carefully!  Don’t want to get stung!) to take them outside but they were struggling.  Then, lucky for them, I remembered this post, and dropped some sugar water next to them.  They revived after drinking, and three of them made it.

So thanks for sharing this, it helped!

What didn’t help was to make a saucer full of sugar water and just dropping the bees in there.  They almost drowned.  (Idiot compassion much?)  I should have remembered the spoon like in this picture.  I ended up just creating little drops of water on the ground and kind of pushing each bee’s face into it.  She inevitably started drinking.

(via thehippiepagan)


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