Buddhist Boer

word-stuck:

tɕāj
Olives are bitter!

(Everyone knows that, stupid octopus head).

Yeah, but today, over lunch, I actually tasted the bitterness.  Honestly, I’ve never tasted that before!

Beginner’s mind, always experiencing things as if they’ve never been experienced before.

Mindfulness, knowing what’s here with me, as it’s unfolding.

After Saturday’s workshop with Lucy (amazing teacher, btw.  I would really recommend going to any of her workshops) she asked each to commit to one change.  I committed to eating my lunch mindfully.  And to remember to do the Self-Compassionate Break.

It’s been four days, and I’ve had four mindful lunches (as mindful as I can manage at this point in my journey) and today’s salad had olives and feta cheese, and honestly I didn’t really think there was a difference between those two, meaning olives had always tasted salty to me before.

And today I tasted the bitter.

Who knows what I’ll taste tomorrow?


I have to admit, exploring taste is one challenging and absolutely amazing part of being mindful.  I’ve always only responded to very strong tastes - sweet, salt, sour, in the extreme.  Discovering nuances in my food - cake is not just cake, there’s a difference between chocolate and vanilla - opening up a whole new world.

How’s your lunch?

kagyupretoria:

Tonight will be our last meditation group for the first term.  Next week we will not have a Wednesday session, but have an exiting Saturday programme in Eldoraigne. (please see picture above and remember to RSVP your spot).

Wednesday sessions will continue on 9 April.  View the calender here.
kagyupretoria:

A Day Of Mindfulness facilitated by Lucy Draper-Clarke

Please note that this is 100% secular training.  Here is a link to an article on Physcology Today on some of the benefits of this practise:  http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/compassion-matters/201303/benefits-mindfulness

PDF invite attached.

Please don’t let cost be the reason you don’t attend, we’re open for negotiations.  The price includes a light vegetarian lunch.

RSVP ptaeastdharmastudies@gmail.com

Olives are bitter!

(Everyone knows that, stupid octopus head).

Yeah, but today, over lunch, I actually tasted the bitterness.  Honestly, I’ve never tasted that before!

Beginner’s mind, always experiencing things as if they’ve never been experienced before.

Mindfulness, knowing what’s here with me, as it’s unfolding.

After Saturday’s workshop with Lucy (amazing teacher, btw.  I would really recommend going to any of her workshops) she asked each to commit to one change.  I committed to eating my lunch mindfully.  And to remember to do the Self-Compassionate Break.

It’s been four days, and I’ve had four mindful lunches (as mindful as I can manage at this point in my journey) and today’s salad had olives and feta cheese, and honestly I didn’t really think there was a difference between those two, meaning olives had always tasted salty to me before.

And today I tasted the bitter.

Who knows what I’ll taste tomorrow?

I have to admit, exploring taste is one challenging and absolutely amazing part of being mindful.  I’ve always only responded to very strong tastes - sweet, salt, sour, in the extreme.  Discovering nuances in my food - cake is not just cake, there’s a difference between chocolate and vanilla - opening up a whole new world.

How’s your lunch?

kagyupretoria:

Tonight will be our last meditation group for the first term.  Next week we will not have a Wednesday session, but have an exiting Saturday programme in Eldoraigne. (please see picture above and remember to RSVP your spot).
Wednesday sessions will continue on 9 April.  View the calender here.

kagyupretoria:

A Day Of Mindfulness facilitated by Lucy Draper-Clarke
Please note that this is 100% secular training.  Here is a link to an article on Physcology Today on some of the benefits of this practise:  http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/compassion-matters/201303/benefits-mindfulness
PDF invite attached.
Please don’t let cost be the reason you don’t attend, we’re open for negotiations.  The price includes a light vegetarian lunch.
Shantideva is saying that as long as we justify our own hard-heartedness and our own self-righteousness, joy and peace will always elude us. We point our fingers at the wrongdoers, but we ourselves are mirror images; everyone is outraged at everyone else’s wrongness.

Pema Chodron

It feels like every time I get a message from the Pema Chodron Heart Advice newsletter, it’s exactly what I need to hear at that moment.  How do they know what I need to hear?  Or is it that the advice is just so universally applicable?

I wish to be happy.  I long to be happy.  How can I have more joy in my life?

And how can I possibly admit that the problems I’m having with you is just a mirror?  That this is what I’m like?

Do we at least aspire to not consider ourselves a problem, but simply a pretty typical human being who could at that moment give him- or herself a break and stop being so predictable?
Pema Chodron
kagyupretoria:

A Day Of Mindfulness facilitated by Lucy Draper-Clarke

Please note that this is 100% secular training.  Here is a link to an article on Physcology Today on some of the benefits of this practise:  http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/compassion-matters/201303/benefits-mindfulness

PDF invite attached.

Please don’t let cost be the reason you don’t attend, we’re open for negotiations.  The price includes a light vegetarian lunch.

RSVP ptaeastdharmastudies@gmail.com

So excited about this!  Hope we have many people :-D

kagyupretoria:

A Day Of Mindfulness facilitated by Lucy Draper-Clarke
Please note that this is 100% secular training.  Here is a link to an article on Physcology Today on some of the benefits of this practise:  http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/compassion-matters/201303/benefits-mindfulness
PDF invite attached.
Please don’t let cost be the reason you don’t attend, we’re open for negotiations.  The price includes a light vegetarian lunch.

So excited about this!  Hope we have many people :-D

Body Scan

kagyupretoria:

Hi

Thanks for joining us yesterday at the meditation group.

"… the body scan as a way to get in touch with the body, let go of feelings of needing to get stuff done, and release pent-up emotions. Just like other forms of meditation, the body scan also trains attention."  source

Here is a three minute version, for those as strapped for time as I am: http://elishagoldstein.com/videos/3-minute-body-scan/  

I especially love the very last thought he leaves us:  ”Connecting with our bodies is an act of self care”.

May you have a wonderful week, full of acts of self care.
Hello babies. Welcome to Earth. It’s hot in the summer and cold in the winter. It’s round and wet and crowded. On the outside, babies, you’ve got a hundred years here. There’s only one rule that I know of, babies: ‘Goddamn it, you’ve got to be kind.’
Kurt Vonnegut

kristen-abigail:

Do yourself a favor & google animals cuddling 😫😭😍🐯🐶🐱🐰🐘🐒🐨💕♥️

<3 <3 <3

(via thehippiepagan)


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